iPoPS

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About

iPoPS 1.2.2

Convert your PSX Discs and ISOs into the PBP format, and play them on your PSP

Features

Faster

You don't have to make the ISO of your Disc yourself. Just put the CD into your drive and let iPoPS to convert it for you!
And if you have one, then it's not a problem: iPoPS can also handle them directly.

Easy to use

Easy to use, it give all options in one window. Customize your EBOOT by selecting an Icon, an Animated Icon, a Background Image, a Sound for it and a Boot Logo. And of course, you can customize your EBOOT Game Title and the Game ID for you SAVES (so no MultiDisc problems anymore). You can also compress your EBOOT by selecting a value from 0 (none) to 9 (maximum)!

Free

It's Open Source, distributed with the MIT license. Give it away as much as you like, as FOSS is our future.

Universal Build

iPoPS is ready for Intel Mac as PPC Mac. The important thing is that you must have Mac OS X.

Native Cocoa

Wrote with the native language of Mac OS X, Cocoa, iPoPS is ready to run on future Mac OS X.

  • Fixed an error that occours when it try to create an image of the CD when the drive is busy. Thanks to _Em of MacScene for the tip!
  • Fixed some error strings
  • Fixed some bugs on detecting CD Type. Now it handle all PSX CD Types
  • Managed some errors (with detailed messagges)
  • Added the support for IMG and BIN disk images
  • Added the support for JPG, BMP and GIF images (when you select an icon or background picture)
  • Some minor aesthetic changes (to fit the support for new disk image and pictures)
  • Added the ability to compress the resulting EBOOT from 0 to 9
  • Fixed a bug that cannot permit to set the Title and the Game ID assigned into the Window
  • Fixed a bug that didn't resize the images from Icon0 and Background1 pictures to the original aspect form
  • Now it fully works on PPC systems (you have to compile it by yourself sorry)
  • Optimized the code of the conversion (that did not permit also to be recompiled on Mac OS X Snow Leopard)
  • First initial relase.

Julian Xhokaxhiu, 2013